Vadehra Artwork Gallery returns to Art Basel this 7 days, giving the world a unusual glimpse into the goals of Balkrishna Vithaldas Doshi. In a selection of paintings, sculptures and drawings, curated as a presentation titled “Labyrinth of Dreams”, B.V. Doshi imagines a surreal architectural landscape entirely devoid of the technical limits of the bodily world.

“His mind is definitely free, and he is generating an imaginary entire world for himself,” describes Doshi’s granddaughter, Khushnu Panthaki Hoof, who is herself an architect, and also curator of his exhibitions. “It is seriously a incredibly pure kind of expression for him.”

Doshi doesn’t have any official education as an architect, and learnt most of his craft though operating as an apprentice to Le Corbusier. “He did not know how to chat in French, and even his English was quite weak,” Hoof reveals. “So they communicated in a very cryptic language, where Corbusier would sit next to him and draw to reveal really simple issues, like how you shift as a result of a place and what you experience.”

Also browse: At 94, B.V. Doshi is awarded the RIBA Royal Gold Medal 2022

Remnants of Memories V, 2020

Vadehra Art Gallery

Doshi’s deft weaving of condition, line and color comes jointly as a surreal globe that is straight away recognizable, but uncannily eerie—not not like how dreams tend to distort even the spaces we find most familiar. Some styles advise doorways many others recommend windows. There are parts that search like roads, segments that look like they could be roofs—but it is all implied. This is exactly where Doshi’s mastery shines—the paintings aren’t about the form at all they are about the areas that these kinds counsel to the human mind. As a viewer, you are an equivalent participant in the procedures of Doshi’s imagination.

“He does not glimpse at lines as one thing that is static,” says Hoof, introducing that “for him, the line and the paper are alive, and he is just a medium. He is actually travelling via that landscape that he is creating on paper.”