Miss.Tic, whose provocative work began cropping up in the Montmartre neighbourhood of Paris in the mid-80s and built her a pioneer of French street art, died on Sunday aged 66, her household told AFP.

Radhia Novat grew up in the slender streets in the shadow of Sacre-Coeur basilica, the daughter of a Tunisian father and a mother from Normandy in western France, where she started stencilling sly and emancipatory slogans.

Her spouse and children said she had died of an unspecified health issues.

Other French street artists paid out tribute to her get the job done.

On Twitter, street artist Christian Guemy, alias C215, hailed “a person of the founders of stencil art”. The walls of the 13th arrondissement of Paris – in which her images are a common sight – “will in no way be the very same all over again”, he wrote.

One more colleague, “Jef Aerosol” claimed she experienced fought her last health issues with braveness, in a tribute posted on Instagram.

And France’s recently appointed Culture Minister, Rima Abdul Malak, saluted her “legendary, resolutely feminist” operate.

Skip.Tic’s do the job frequently bundled intelligent wordplays — almost normally dropped in translation — and a heroine with flowing black hair who resembled the artist herself. The visuals became fixtures on walls across the money.

“I experienced a background in street theatre, and I liked this idea of avenue artwork,” Miss out on.Tic said in a 2011 job interview.

“At to start with I thought, ‘I’m going to create poems’. And then, ‘we will need images’ with these poems. I started out with self-portraits and then turned toward other women of all ages,” she mentioned.

Overlook.Tic also drew the interest of regulation enforcement above grievances of defacing public assets, foremost to an arrest in 1997.

But her performs came to be shown in galleries in France and abroad, with some obtained by the Paris modern-day artwork fund of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, according to her web-site.

And cinema buffs will recognise her work on the poster for Claude Chabrol’s 2007 film “La fille coupee en deux” (“A Female Lower in Two”).

For a spell she was a favourite of fashion brand names this sort of as Kenzo and Louis Vuitton.

“So normally it can be not recognized that you can be younger and lovely and have issues to say,” she told AFP in 2011.

“But it is really legitimate that they offer us what they want with gorgeous women. So I thought, I’m going to use these ladies to offer them poetry.”

Her funeral, the day of which is nevertheless to be introduced, will be open up to the community, said her household.