A muted portrait by Los Angeles–based painter Henry Taylor retains central billing in the downtown Manhattan property of artwork patrons Bernard Lumpkin and Carmine Boccuzzi. It depicts a younger Black gentleman, donning a simple white T-shirt and a backward-turned baseball cap, who sits driving a teal dinette, gazing toward the viewer. A cake, lacking a slice, rests atop the kitchen area table beneath a glass bell jar, suggesting a scene of celebration, a satisfied celebration. On the back of the canvas, a short inscription reminds of the painting’s issue, Taylor’s “sweeter than chocolate nephew William Rorex Jr.”—an ode to spouse and children and the ease and comfort of the domestic space—while a reared-up horse rendered in the background, a recurring motif across the artist’s oeuvre, seems aligned as a hopeful impression of independence.

The painting captures the ideals at the coronary heart of this household, wherever a resplendent, rotating range from a virtually 500-piece art selection appears to be to emphasize every single area. “It is an graphic of Black existence,” Lumpkin describes, “that’s satisfied and hopeful and celebratory.” Lumpkin and Boccuzzi are devoted collectors of get the job done by Black American artists, with a major lens on present-day pieces from the previous 25 decades. All through the twentieth century, and however to this day, operate by Black artists has been mainly underrepresented and undersupported by American museums, but many thanks to the sustained, mixed endeavours of Black curators, activists, students, and collectors, like Lumpkin, that is slowly setting up to improve. But, Lumpkin factors out, that movement commenced at house. “There was a time when museums, or galleries, or collectors weren’t interested in African-American artists, and so the artwork stayed inside the community,” he describes. “The excellent matter about that is it survived. It was found and demonstrated.”

A portrait named for its painter Henry Taylor’s nephew, The Sweet William Rorex Jr. (2010), presides around a guitar pick–shaped table by Brazilian architect Arthur Casas in the central open-idea dwelling-eating region in Lumpkin and Boccuzzi’s Tribeca loft. “I experienced just a potent connection with this,” Lumpkin says. “It’s the a person that purchased me.”

In lots of ways, Lumpkin is continuing that legacy, but he is also making on it. His and Boccuzzi’s assortment consists of is effective by such celebrated arms as Kara Walker, who famously constructed a 35-foot bare-breasted Sphinx from bleached sugar in a decrepit Brooklyn manufacturing unit in 2014, as nicely as an at any time-expanding roster of up-and-coming artists, like Troy Michie, who normally takes advantage of collage as a device to deconstruct tips of representation and misrepresentation. Lots of of these can be viewed in the nationally traveling exhibition “Young, Gifted and Black,” or in the forthcoming monograph of the exact title, edited by critic Antwaun Sargent.

Lumpkin, a previous MTV Information producer, and Boccuzzi, a partner at the law agency Cleary Gottlieb, moved into the Tribeca loft in 2011. Although the bones stay largely unchanged considering that their arrival, the married pair enlisted the architecture company Bade Stageberg Cox to reconstruct the inner structure. A white wall now partly splits the open up-notion residing-eating spot, where by Taylor’s portray hangs, from a playroom, accented with a bedazzled rendering of Mary J. Blige by Mickalene Thomas and a figurative portray by rising artist Jonathan Lyndon Chase a panel of textured glass panes concealed inside of could be pulled out to absolutely cordon off the house. Right here, the pair has weathered a hurricane, a pandemic, and, via it, the upbringing of 3 youthful little ones.